Archive for May, 2009

Skidaway Institute’s new building ready

May 26, 2009
Marine and Coastal Science Research and Instructional Center

Marine and Coastal Science Research and Instructional Center

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography scientists have begun moving into a newly-built research facility on the Skidaway campus. The Marine and Coastal Science Research and Instructional Center (MCSRIC) will be officially dedicated on Tuesday, June 2, at 9:30 a.m.

The MCSRIC contains 11,000 square-feet of research laboratories and offices, space for visiting scientists, and instructional space for marine science students from throughout the University System of Georgia.

The building was funded with a $5 million dollar appropriation approved by the Georgia General Assembly in 2006 and signed by Governor Sonny Perdue.

The MSRIC will allow Skidaway Institute to expand its research in several areas, including  the development of new technologies associated with ocean observation systems; discovering the diversity of species and their interactions in the marine environment: and the assessment of factors affecting the environmental health and integrity of Georgia’s coastal zone.
The MCSRIC has been designed to be environmentally friendly and is expect to be certified under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System.

The building’s orientation minimizes its east-west exposure which reduces the heat it will absorb from the sun. This orientation is one reason the MCSRIC is 31 percent more energy efficient than a comparable building. Its courtyard, roof and sidewalks are organic or reflect the sun’s energy, further reducing the amount of heat the building will absorb.

The layout of the MCSRIC’s interior minimizes the building’s perimeter, reducing the energy and heat that can leak into or out of the building. The common work areas and the central hallway are open to the roof and have a row of upper windows running the length of the building. This allows natural night to flood the building on sunny days and saves on lighting energy.

Other “green” characteristics of the building include a solar hot water heating system, a 1,000 gallon cistern to capture rainwater for various uses, six-inch foam insulation and energy efficient windows.

The architect for the MCSRIC was Lord, Aeck & Sargent, Inc.. The construction manager was Choate Construction. Engineering work was done by Hussey, Gay, Bell & DeYoung International Inc., and Nottingham, Brook & Pennington, Inc.

‘Planet Earth in the 21st Century’ wraps up Skidaway Institute spring lecture series

May 6, 2009

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography’s spring lecture series will wrap up with a two-speaker program titled “Planet Earth in the 21st Century.” The program will be presented twice, on Monday, May 11, at the Coastal Georgia Center on Fahm Street in downtown Savannah and again on Thursday, May 14, in the library auditorium at Skidaway Institute. Both programs will begin at 7 p.m. Admission is free.

The program is the final program in the lecture series under the umbrella title “Living with the Ocean” that has focused on the 21st century ocean and man’s interaction with it.

Peter Verity

Peter Verity

Skidaway Institute professor Peter Verity will begin the program with his talk “How We are Changing the Ocean.” Included in his talk, Verity will discuss the way overfishing is changing the functioning of marine ecosystems; greenhouse gas increases are changing climate, warming and acidifying the oceans and raising sea level; and ocean pollution and toxic compounds are threatening species survival.

“The scope and scale of human activities now have the oceans on a new trajectory towards an uncertain future,” said Verity. “This path is definitely not favorable by comparison with past and even present assessments of intrinsic value of the oceans.”

Herb Windom

Herb Windom

Skidaway Institute professor Herb Windom will present the second half of the program with a talk titled “Real Time and Real Important: Environmental Observation in the 21st Century.” Windom will explore the ways in which scientists have explored the environment in the past and, how many of those observations have been inadequate for the conclusions that have been drawn. He will also discuss the way new technology is drastically changing the way scientists will study the ocean and the planet in general in the future.

The program will begin at 7 p.m. on both days.

For additional information, call Michael Sullivan at (912) 598-2325 or visit the Skidaway Institute Web site at www.skio.usg.edu.

We’re moving in!

May 5, 2009

Mike Sullivan writes:

The new Marine and Coastal Science Research and Instructional Center is coming to life.  Four of our scientists, Marc Frischer, Liz Mann, Aaron Peck and Jim Nelson, are starting to move in along with their research teams.

This project has been a long time coming. One of our supporters says it has been in the works for 13 years, but that pre-dates me by nine years.

Skidaway Institute MCSRIC

Skidaway Institute MCSRIC

The $5 million, 11,000-square foot building houses eight offices for scientists, six labs and extensive additional workspace for research assistants, students, visitors and so on.

Research Assistant Karen Butler works in one of the labs.

Research Assistant Karen Butler works in one of the labs.

The MCSRIC has been designed to be environmentally friendly and is expected to be certified under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System.

The building’s orientation minimizes its east-west exposure which reduces the heat it will absorb from the sun. This orientation is one reason the MCSRIC is 31 per cent more energy efficient than a comparable building. Its courtyard, roof and sidewalks are organic or reflect the sun’s energy, further reducing the amount of heat the building will absorb.

The layout of the MCSRIC’s interior minimizes the building’s perimeter, reducing the energy and heat that can leak into or out of the building. The common work areas and the central hallway are open to the roof and have a row of upper windows running the length of the building. This allows natural night to flood the building on sunny days and saves on lighting energy.

Other “green” characteristics of the building include a solar hot water heating system, a 1,000 gallon cistern to capture rainwater for various uses, six-inch foam insulation and energy efficient windows.