Archive for October, 2010

Skidaway Institute’s research center receives LEED® Gold Certification plaque

October 20, 2010

The Savannah Branch of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) presented a LEED® Gold Certification plaque to the Marine and Coastal Science Research and Instructional Center (MCSRIC) at Skidaway Institute of Oceanography on Tuesday, October 19.

Denise Grabowski of the Savannah Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council presents the LEED Gold Certification plaque to Skidaway Institute Plant Superintendent Chuck Hartman.

Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) is an internationally recognized green building certification system, providing third-party verification that a building or community was designed and built using strategies intended to improve performance in areas such as energy savings, water efficiency, CO2 emissions reduction, improved indoor environmental quality, and stewardship of resources and sensitivity to their impacts.

Completed in mid-2009, the MCSRIC research and laboratory building was designed from the outset to be environmentally friendly.

“From very beginning of the planning process, it was important for us to design and build a facility that adhered to the best environmental standards,” said Skidaway Institute director Jim Sanders. “We thank the U.S. Green Building Council for recognizing our efforts.”

The building’s orientation minimizes its east-west exposure which reduces the heat it absorbs from the sun. This orientation is one reason the MCSRIC is 31 percent more energy efficient than a comparable building. Its courtyard, roof and sidewalks are organic or reflect the sun’s energy, further reducing the amount of heat the building will absorb.

The layout of the MCSRIC’s interior minimizes the building’s perimeter, reducing the energy and heat that can leak into or out of the building. The common work areas and the central hallway are open to the roof and have a row of upper windows running the length of the building. This allows natural night to flood the building on sunny days and saves on lighting energy.

Other “green” characteristics of the building include a solar hot water heating system, a 1,000 gallon cistern to capture rainwater for various uses, six-inch foam insulation and energy efficient windows.

The MCSRIC contains 11,000 square-feet of state-of-the-art research laboratories and offices, space for visiting scientists, and instructional space for marine science students from throughout the University System of Georgia. It was funded with a $5 million dollar appropriation approved by the Georgia General Assembly in 2006 and signed by Governor Sonny Perdue.

The architect for the MCSRIC was Lord, Aeck & Sargent, Inc.. The construction manager was Choate Construction. Engineering work was done by Hussey, Gay, Bell & DeYoung International Inc., and Nottingham, Brook & Pennington, Inc.

Skidaway Marine Science Day a success!

October 18, 2010

We had a beautiful day last Saturday as more than 1,900 visitors converged on our campus for our annual open house,  Skidaway Marine Science Day.

The event featured activities geared for all ages from young children to adults. These included programs, tours, displays and hands-on activities, primarily related to marine science.

Skidaway Marine Science Day was presented Skidaway Institute and our campus partners, including the University of Georgia (UGA) Marine Education Center and Aquarium, the UGA Shellfish Research Laboratory, Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary and WSVH Georgia Public Radio.

The Skidaway Institute offered a variety of activities for adults and children, including tours of the Research Vessel Savannah;

R/V Savannah

Visitors in the R/V Savannah's "dry lab."

A crowd on "the bridge."

science displays and talks on current research programs; and hands-on science activities.

Charles Roberston explains a CTD array.

Jay Brandes explains some of the science behind the Gulf oil spill.

The UGA Marine Extension Service Aquarium was be open with no admission fee. In addition, the aquarium education staff offered visitors a full afternoon of activities including science talks, a reptile show, boat tours, touch tanks, and behind-the-scene tours of the aquarium.

The aquarium touch tanks are always popular.

The UGA Shellfish Laboratory provided visitors with displays and information on marine life on the Georgia Coast.

Bagging oyster shells for a good cause can actually be fun.

Children were given the opportunity to help protect the marine environment by bagging oyster shells used for oyster reef restoration projects.

Driving ROVs in the pool.

The staff of Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary set up their remotely-operated-vehicle (ROV) in a swimming pool and teach visitors how to “drive” it and pick up objects from the bottom.

WSVH Georgia Public Radio was open for visitors.

Skidaway Institute professor Bill Savidge presented a special program, “The Seven Deadly Sins of Science Fair Projects,” aimed at parents and students involved in science fair projects.

For the second year in a row, Skidaway Marine Science Day was also open to non-campus scientific and environmental groups.

Some children got "up close and personal" with wildlife.

Maybe a little too up-close.

Organizations such as the Georgia Department of  Natural Resources, The Dolphin Project and the Georgia Sea Turtle Center were on-hand to present, information, displays and activities.

The Diamond Terrapin Project brought some of their subjects, which were a big hit with the younger set.

Kids prepare their model plankton for the Plankton Sink-Off.

The Plankton Sink Off is a race to see who can get to the bottom of the tank last.

And what would a festival be without some face painting.

We have a much larger photo gallery on the Skidaway Institute Web site.

Skidaway Institute’s research center to receive LEED® Gold Certification plaque

October 11, 2010

When: Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Where: Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Skidaway Island, Savannah, Ga.

Time: 6:00 p.m.

The Savannah Branch of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) will present a LEED® Gold Certification plaque to the Marine and Coastal Science Research and Instructional Center (MCSRIC) at Skidaway Institute of Oceanography on Tuesday, October 19, at 6 p.m.

Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) is an internationally recognized green building certification system, providing third-party verification that a building or community was designed and built using strategies intended to improve performance in areas such as energy savings, water efficiency, CO2 emissions reduction, improved indoor environmental quality, and stewardship of resources and sensitivity to their impacts.

Completed in mid-2009, the MCSRIC research and laboratory building was designed from the outset to be environmentally friendly.

The building’s orientation minimizes its east-west exposure which reduces the heat it will absorb from the sun. This orientation is one reason the MCSRIC is 31 percent more energy efficient than a comparable building. Its courtyard, roof and sidewalks are organic or reflect the sun’s energy, further reducing the amount of heat the building will absorb.

The layout of the MCSRIC’s interior minimizes the building’s perimeter, reducing the energy and heat that can leak into or out of the building. The common work areas and the central hallway are open to the roof and have a row of upper windows running the length of the building. This allows natural night to flood the building on sunny days and saves on lighting energy.

Other “green” characteristics of the building include a solar hot water heating system, a 1,000 gallon cistern to capture rainwater for various uses, six-inch foam insulation and energy efficient windows.

The MCSRIC contains 11,000 square-feet of state-of-the-art research laboratories and offices, space for visiting scientists, and instructional space for marine science students from throughout the University System of Georgia. It was funded with a $5 million dollar appropriation approved by the Georgia General Assembly in 2006 and signed by Governor Sonny Perdue.

The architect for the MCSRIC was Lord, Aeck & Sargent, Inc.. The construction manager was Choate Construction. Engineering work was done by Hussey, Gay, Bell & DeYoung International Inc., and Nottingham, Brook & Pennington, Inc.

Immediately following Choate Construction Company will sponsor the inaugural event for the USGBC GA Savannah Branch Emerging Professionals Committee. Appetizers and beverages will be available. The event is free and the public is encouraged to attend.

Skidaway Institute lecture to focus threats to water quality

October 8, 2010

The growing threats to water quality and the potential affect on Coastal Georgia will be the focus of the first lecture in the next program in the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography 2010 Fall Lecture Series, “Crystal Ball: Changes Afoot for Our Oceans and Coast in the 21st Century. ”

The final program in the series will be presented on Monday, October 11, at 7 p.m. at the Jewish Educational Alliance (JEA) on Abercorn Street. The same program will be repeated on Thursday, October 14, also at 7 p.m., in the McGowen Library Auditorium on the Skidaway Institute campus.

 

Dr. Marc Frischer in the field.

 

Skidaway Institute professor Marc Frischer will open the program with an examination of the threats to local water quality.

“Since the beginning of the 18th century and the Industrial Revolution, water quality has been recognized as a critical public health and welfare issue,” said Frischer. “With the world population approaching seven billion, a significant fraction of fresh water resources contaminated, and potentially catastrophic ecosystem changes associated with climate change looming, there is a growing recognition that protection of the world’s water resources goes well beyond drinking water and human pathogen management.”

Frischer will discuss an ongoing long-term coastal water and ecosystem monitoring program in the southeastern United States where environmental are underway that threaten the long-term health and sustainability of coastal water resources in the region.

 

Dr. Dana Savidge

 

In the second lecture on the program, Skidaway Institute professor Dana Savidge will describe new high-tech developments that allow scientists to study the ocean by remote control. These include the development of technologies to gather information from shore or satellite; increasing variety in autonomous vehicles gathering measurements at sea; and exciting new “laboratory in a capsule” instruments performing analysis in the ocean that had previously only been possible by transporting seawater samples to labs on land. Savidge will discuss some of these new capabilities and the national effort to develop an effective national ocean observatory within which to operate them.

All programs will begin at 7 p.m.

Admission to the lectures will be $5 per program for adults. Students and members of the Skidaway Marine Science Foundation and The Learning Center will be admitted free.

For additional information, visit the Skidaway Institute Web site at www.skio.usg.edu or call (912) 598-2325.