Archive for September, 2015

An early morning TV story at UGA Skidaway Institute

September 22, 2015

WSAV TV and reporter Martin Staunton aired a story t his morning on Dr. Clark Alexander’s study on sea level rise on the Georgia coast.

http://wsav.com/2015/09/22/rising-sea-level-may-change-georgias-marshes/

Mark your calendar for Skidaway Marine Science Day

September 18, 2015

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UGA Skidaway Institute scientist stands atop the globe

September 14, 2015

University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography researcher Chris Marsay is on top of the world—literally.

UGA Skidaway Institute scientist Chris Marsay at the North Pole, with the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the background.

UGA Skidaway Institute scientist Chris Marsay at the North Pole, with the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the background.

Marsay arrived at the North Pole in early September. He is taking part in the US GEOTRACES Arctic Expedition on board the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a polar icebreaker.

The project is part of an international, multiple icebreaker effort to conduct geochemical sampling of the Arctic Ocean. The cruise arrived at 90 degrees north on Sept. 5 in what is the first occupation of the North Pole by an unaccompanied U.S. surface ship—submarines usually follow ships below the ice. While at the pole, the Healy rendezvoused with the German ship conducting the German leg of the GEOTRACES Arctic program.

Marsay is working with UGA Skidaway Institute professor Cliff Buck and scientists from Florida State University and Rutgers University. The research team has been funded by the National Science Foundation to collect samples from the atmosphere, precipitation and surface water from melt ponds during the cruise.

Chris Marsay collects samples at the North Pole.

Chris Marsay collects samples at the North Pole.

“Our research goals are to describe the chemistry of atmospheric deposition to the region and quantify flux rates,” Buck said. “These data will then be shared with the scientific community to better understand biogeochemical cycling of trace elements and isotopes in the Arctic Ocean.”

Shrimp and black gill in Hakai Magazine

September 4, 2015

There is an interesting story in Hakai Magazine on Georgia shrimpers that includes Skidaway Institute’s work on black gill.

Hakai Magazine

Skidaway-Sapelo summer course featured in Georgia Magazine

September 3, 2015

The UGA  joint summer research methods course, taught partially at UGA Skidaway Institute, was the featured cover story in the latest issue of Georgia Magazine. The four-week course was split between the UGA Marine Institute on Sapelo Island and Skidaway Institute. Click on the cover to read this very nice article.

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Elizabeth Harvey joins Skidaway Institute faculty

September 3, 2015

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABiological oceanographer Elizabeth Harvey has joined the faculty of the University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography as an assistant professor.

Harvey received her bachelor’s degree in marine science from the University of Maine and a master’s in environmental science from Western Washington University. She earned her doctorate in oceanography from the University of Rhode Island. Immediately prior to joining Skidaway Institute, she completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Harvey’s research focus is on the mechanisms of mortality in the planktonic environment in the ocean and how that influences food web structure and biogeochemical cycling.

Skidaway researchers “caricaturized”

September 2, 2015

A couple of our researchers, Mike Robinson and LeeAnn DeLeo, made a caricature appearance in an editorial cartoon in the Savannah Morning News this week. Thanks, cartoonist Mark Streeter!Streeter Cartoon

Skidaway Marine Science Day to feature Georgia’s first oyster hatchery

September 1, 2015

A close-up look at Georgia’s first oyster hatchery will be one of the featured attractions at Skidaway Marine Science Day on Saturday, Oct. 24. The campus-wide open house will be held from noon to 4 p.m. on the University of Georgia’s Skidaway Island campus, located on the north end of the island.

The oyster research team will provide behind-the-scenes tours of the new hatchery, which is a project of the UGA Marine Extension’s Shellfish Laboratory and Georgia Sea Grant, units of UGA Public Service and Outreach. It is hoped the oyster hatchery will make the Georgia oyster industry more durable, contribute to aquaculture diversification and elevate one of Georgia’s best-kept culinary secrets from the backyard roast to the tables of the finest restaurants from Savannah to Atlanta and beyond.

The hatchery tour is just one feature of a lengthy program of activities, displays and tours making the annual event one that attracts thousands of visitors each year.

The UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography’s 92-foot ocean-going Research Vessel Savannah will be open for tours and will exhibit science displays.

Tours of the Research Vessel Savannah are popular with visitors to Skidaway Marine Science Day.

Tours of the Research Vessel Savannah are popular with visitors to Skidaway Marine Science Day.

Elsewhere on campus, Skidaway Institute will present a variety of marine science exhibits and hands-on science activities, including the ever popular Microbe Hunt and Plankton Sink-Off. Skidaway Institute scientists will present a series of short, informal talks and question-and-answer sessions on current scientific and environmental issues.

The UGA Aquarium, operated by UGA Marine Extension, will be open to visitors with no admission fee. Aquarium educators will offer visitors an afternoon full of activities including a hands-on reptile exhibit, behind-the-scenes peeks of the aquarium, fish feedings and microscope investigations. A brand new touch tank exhibit will allow guests of all ages to get up close and personal with common coastal invertebrates.

Touch tanks allow visitors to get up close and personal with sea creatures.

Touch tanks allow visitors to get up close and personal with sea creatures.

Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary will offer visitors the experience of using the tools of the trade. They can explore an underwater reef with a remotely operated vehicle and find out how youth can participate in Savannah’s own MATE ROV competition. ROVs are underwater robots used on NOAA research vessels worldwide and are crucial for data collection in marine environments.

Visitors can also visualize themselves SCUBA diving at Gray’s Reef with a photo booth and post their pictures on social media.

Along with the campus organizations, Skidaway Marine Science Day will also include displays, demonstrations and activities from a wide range of science, environmental and education groups, such as The Dolphin Project, the Georgia Sea Turtle Center and The Nature Conservancy. Georgia Power will also be on hand to provide information on the upcoming wind turbine project planned for the Skidaway Institute campus.

All activities at Skidaway Marine Science Day are free. For additional information, call 912-598-2325, or see http://www.skio.uga.edu.